I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

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JerryL770
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby JerryL770 » Wed May 22, 2019 5:22 pm

That twin Ultra-Stick certainly looks the business Mike. On the noise front, I have an OS FP40 with an silencer extension which fits between the 2 sections of the silencer, with a baffle. Makes it much quieter. You may be able to find some to fit your silencers ........... ???? ..... or make some, I can photograph mine if that would help.

I suspect one problem you may find in the flying is the doubling up of the motor torque causing it to turn more sharply one way and less so the other. On my electric powered Deuces Wild I had motors turning in opposite directions and it was very sweet to fly.

I agree 100% on your comments re CAA proposal :evil: :evil:

Just back from 1,100 mile round trip to the Spa Classic racing in my E with SWIMBO. Had a super time if restricted parade laps round the track :(
JerryL
1970 E-Type S2 FHC. Dark Blue with Red interior. MX5 seats
Ariel Leader returned to the road since 1974 - now passed to someone more enthusiastic :)
Various R/C flying models

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J44EAG
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Wed May 22, 2019 9:21 pm

An interesting few days have been had.

Saturday morning saw me up at the Croydon field to fly. No such luck. The paint ball shooting guys had over fifty cars on their area and and quite a gathering of multi-coloured people plastered from head to toe in paint. Certainly an odd sort of hobby but one that is often used by companies in their team building attempts. It might work for them but it wouldn`t work for me. I`m far too old and cynical. Getting covered in paint is hardly likely to encourage me to become a team player! When paint shooting takes place, over flying the of that site by models is forbidden by CAA and Club rules. That is fair enough. As I returned home, one of the flying guys rang me with an invitation to fly at the Falcon Flyers site further over towards Biggin Hill.

The Croydon, Falcon and Sevenoaks Club sites are all along a ridge which extends for about five miles in a south to north direction from the top of the Surrey North Downs towards the suburbs of South East London. The ridge drops into the Biggin Hill valley away to the east. Right atop the steep sides of the valley below Biggin Hill, sits the airfield. The proximity is about a mile and a half from the Falcons site. Standing on the road outside the model flying site, the Biggin Hill former war-time Officers Mess can be clearly seen as can the Bernie Eckstein shed together with a large, new blackened glass building sitting right on the end of southern runway. I was astonished at the close proximity of the airfield. It is an ideal spot to view an air show for free!

Biggin is now an International EASA registered "Airport" rather than just a lower grade nationally licensed "Airfield". All the small private aircraft have been given their marching orders and exec jets will become the norm. The Biggin Hill Airport as it is now referred to comes under International EASA and UK CAA Flight Protection Zone rules. A large exclusion circle is drawn from a fixed mapping point usually in the middle of an airfield. Rectangular extensions push out from the circle which give similar protection for the take off and landing needs of the aircraft.

Anyone seeking to fly model aircraft over 250g/about 8 ounces weight, must not fly in those Restricted Zone areas without written permission from the local NATS (National Air Traffic Service). A request may or may not be successful and almost certainly will contain restrictions and constraints. This is the case for model flyers operating from either the Croydon, Falcon or Sevenoaks Club sites where we have recently had our operating heights reduced from 400ft to 300ft and seen a total ban in the use of pure drone un-manned flying types of craft. A model weight limit of 7Kg/15.8Lbs is also enforced as part of the permission to fly. One can expect to face prosecution if one flies any model without the mandatory permissions being sought.

All three local clubs breathed a sigh of relief that they were able to continue flying following the last round of CAA adjustments relating to UK model flying. This matter has previously been discussed on this thread, together with the additional un-necessary, costly and compulsory remote pilot registration requirement which was suddenly sprung upon us. This controversial issue has arisen even though our National flying association (BMFA) already has such a system in place. That is a separate issue.

My visit to the Falcon site was interesting. Their site is large and flat.The taxi way and landing strip was impeccably maintained and membership is strictly limited to just thirty members. Membership is by invitation only and I`m pleased to say I received an unsolicited offer to join them whilst I was with them. Members are all mature guys with nothing to prove. They just quietly wish to fly their models in a relaxed and friendly way. I greatly enjoyed my couple of flights in their company. I must have said and done the right things.The paperwork for application is now with me and receiving attention. The site is an ideal location just a further three minutes further by car than the Croydon site which is just twelve minutes travel from home. By comparison, the Riddlesdown Club of which I am also a member, is some forty minutes and 16 miles distant to the south of Edenbridge. The Falcon site would make an ideal place to have the twin engine Ultra Stick test flown. So options have expanded further.

James, the Chairman of Caterham Club and probably the best model pilot locally, has agreed to test and set up the twin Ultra Stick once I have engines running well. The designer of the original Ultra Stick, Ali Machinchy, has been sent images and my specification for my twin engine conversion. An email was received by return which included suggestions, comments and massive encouragement. Similarly, Ali`s father, Big Ali, has also been included in the mail conversations and a lovely email was also received from him last night. Big Ali owns a model shop in Milton Keynes and has supplied several Ultra Stick kits to me over the last year. Not surprisingly, my antics with the Ultra Stick have helped build a great supplier/end user relationship. In answer to Jerrys` comments as regards the torque reactions of having oth engines rotating in the same direction, the best I can do with the set up created is to add side thrust to the motors and add an electronic rudder gyro to sense if the model is in a yaw situation. The gyro would automatically apply rudder to help a pilot if for instance one engine were to flame out. I agree, the set up is perhaps not ideal. As regards enhanced engine silencing, yes I have a few of the super quiet mufflers here for other engine but will also try to find a matched pair to suit the twin OS .46 power units. If noise is un-acceptable, then I may well have to consider buying a counter rotate electric power set up or attempting to find someone that could make a right hand rotation crankshaft with appropriate induction timing. I feel sure that would be prohibitively expensive as a one off job. Jerrys` points are very valid and also well appreciated.

Sunday afternoon saw a flying session at the Croydon field with around fourteen flyers being active. I flew four good flights with a moderate wind from the east. Landings and take offs are easy with the wind from that direction. I managed three good, "dead stick" (engine cut to simulate failure), consecutive landings which received a round of applause on each occasion. That filled me with confidence for taking my proficiency A-test on the Tuesday. On Monday, I flew several more flights telling myself I must be particularly careful not to break the model as the test was due to be done next day.

Flying conditions on Monday were completely different from Sunday. Just a 5mph head wind but from the north west rather than from the east. This was my worst nightmare. One has to approach the landing from a different direction passing closely the large model eating oak tree which occupies the far corner of the flying field. One then has to loose height rapidly, slow the model down before turning ninety degrees into what minimal headwind there was. With little wind to slow the model down, its arrival can be fast and furious. One also has to pass over a high hedge and between to slender trees. If you get that line of approach wrong, then the location of the huge oak tree inside the field boundary becomes an issue. On my last flight, my concentration slipped momentarily and I flew straight into that massive tree with a loud report which seemed like the "Crack of Doomsday"! The model hung in the tree for a few second, then plummeted twenty feet to the ground but fortunately in a fairly flat attitude. I cursed the 300 year old person who planted that tree all those years ago. The model sustained damage to a wing tip, a wing leading edge, had the tail plane knocked off and the fuselage wing mount ripped out. Back in the hangar a nine hour panic repair session took place to ready the model for my A-test yesterday.
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Tuesday dawned bright and sunny and with a little more head wind on site. However, the wind direction remained the same as Monday. Perhaps quite naturally, I suffered a severe loss of confidence as a result of the tree incident the previous day. Essentially, I felt things were rather stacked against me. The only way to deal that type of emotional reaction is to "feel the fear and do it anyway". (Erika Jong book). I performed a test flight prior to the arrival of the examiner. The model flew as previously but I certainly had the jitters. I can`t equate generally with emotional reactions preferring logic and rational as a preference. On this occasion emotion had clearly got the better of me. Flying from the Croydon site with the wind from the North West is not the easiest proposition or my favourite option. The examiner understood why I felt rather less confident that I had been on Sunday. My two flights under test conditions were sufficiently well executed though to allow a pass. The oral test questions were answered with minimal difficulty. Comment was passed on a couple of minor mistakes I had made, one of them being that I forgot to shout a "landing" warning on one occasion. That failure to issue a warning occurred as I performed a simulated dead engine landing which required my fullest and undivided attention and concentration.

Under test conditions, almost everyone fails on an odd minor point or two. I was certainly relieved the test was complete and pleased that my abilities were considered sufficient to be given an A-test certificate of achievement. This is a basic level award which has its emphasis on personal and third party safety, air legislation and predictive flying procedure. I have much more to learn with the far more advanced and difficult B-test still to be taken. Taking the B-test is not mandatory but is obviously to be encouraged as it instills a higher level of model flying proficiency. At some flying sites is a requirement to being allowed to fly.

Yesterday lunchtime saw the acquisition of a chilled bottle of Co-op Pinot slip rapidly down the hatch. Never has a bottle of cheap plonk tasted so good or been so well received. Then I fell asleep.....

Mike
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2004 XJR

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JerryL770
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby JerryL770 » Wed May 22, 2019 9:51 pm

:D :D :D :D :D

Well done Mike.

Something I should do but it is not forced on me to fly solo :wink:
JerryL
1970 E-Type S2 FHC. Dark Blue with Red interior. MX5 seats
Ariel Leader returned to the road since 1974 - now passed to someone more enthusiastic :)
Various R/C flying models

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Thu May 23, 2019 7:49 am

At so many model flying Clubs, Jerry, they won`t let you fly solo without having taken the A-test. Some Clubs insist visiting flyers also have a B-test. The BMFA site at Buckminster has that requirement. Fortunately at Croydon, initially, once you can prove to the satisfaction of two committee members that you are competent enough to fly on your own, then they give you the leash to fly and practice solo until you are ready to take the test. With that practice permission gained, one also has to demonstrate that one is also taking on board the legislative side of responsible and legal aspect of operating a model. This means retaining to mind the provisions contained in this link together with questions posed from local Club rules.https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q ... ccP9q2WBmk
https://achievements.bmfa.org/
Down at Riddlesdown, they insist all your initial flying is done linked onto a master/slave buddy box system. This is indeed irksome as you have to find another flyer on the day to take master control and the learning and practice regime becomes incredibly long winded and tedious. I could see I would take several months under such constriction to get anywhere. Had I succumbed to that regime, I would have become so teased off that I would probably have given up and walked away. So I returned to Croydon where for me, the regime was better suited to my needs and temperament. Being allowed to fly solo off the lead at Croydon allowed me to progress from my first flights on the Ultra Stick to A-test in about six weeks having completed about thirty flights with only one mishap over the period.

For me, my needs were rather different from an ab initio learner. That I learned technique over forty years ago gave me something of an advantage over a raw new learner. My technique learned all those years ago was well located in my brain and can be regarded along the lines of once you have learned to ride a bicycle, you never forget it. For me, all I needed was a few cramming sessions to get my flying perception and anticipation up to necessary speed. I learned from my aero college CAA engineers aircraft maintenance course twenty five years earlier that my best learning was achieved by letting me loose and allowing me to learn on the principle of burning ones fingers and gaining from the inevitable mistakes of personal misjudgement! Lets face it, flying an un-manned remote control aircraft (which is what the CAA now defines as a model) is all about mental perception, anticipation of the unexpected and the ability to instantly react to correct what occurs when a model is flying. The anticipation skill becomes more important as wind speeds and gusts increase dependent on weather conditions of the moment.

I also studied this A-test video from Youtube. It was a useful pointer towards learning the sequence required.https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q ... -cnDrCDqqW It was something of a shock for me to not just to belt off this video sequence under test conditions. I had been practice flying the sequence pretty much as shown on this video. Under test conditions though, the examiner called the shots and sequence and I would have to bring the model into the correct position rather than fly my practice sequence which I had devised to make my flow from one demonstration to another as seamless as possible. My certificate of achievement is likely to be presented at the next Club meeting on 30th May.

Mike
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JerryL770
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby JerryL770 » Thu May 23, 2019 11:03 am

I understand all you say there Mike. I learned to fly fixed wing back about 1990 - solo on my local disused airfield. Then, more or less solo learnt to fly helicopter. However, I once went to do an A test for the heli. On the day it was blowing a howling gale and despite my best efforts, I could not hold position :( I've not taken a test since because I've not been forced to. My local club has the requirement in its rules but it is not enforced for flyers seen as competent.

I'm slowly building the Flair Cub and when flying, I will practice for and take the A-test, just to achieve it. Before I duffed the heli A-test, fellow fliers thought I could do the B (which you could do then without doing an A) but a few un-planned arrivals robbed me of confidence and now I only do very basic circuits with the heli.

Links you gave look interesting, I will take a peek. Thanks.
JerryL
1970 E-Type S2 FHC. Dark Blue with Red interior. MX5 seats
Ariel Leader returned to the road since 1974 - now passed to someone more enthusiastic :)
Various R/C flying models

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Fri May 31, 2019 10:58 am

And the latest from the Surrey Hills.....

Saturday saw me attend a wonderful flying BBQ hosted by the excellent Sevenoaks Club. Miles north from Sevenoaks, they have a large and beautiful flying field just seven minutes distant from my home and located along the ridge/valley to the south west of Biggin Hill. They are the southern most of the three model flying clubs operating along the top of what I all the Biggin Hill valley with the ridge running just a couple of miles to the western side of the airfield (now an international airport). The Sevenoaks Club is also constricted by the new CAA rules in regard to Flight Restriction Zones. These dictate a 7kg model weight limit and a mandatory 300ft flying ceiling together with a complete ban on the operation of drones. Images here show about twenty five attendees at the Saturday event with flyers from both Sevenoaks and Croydon Clubs having a great time. It was a no nonsense session devoid of any form of overbearing control or pomposity. One simply adhered to sensible flying procedure and got on with it.
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This week saw the completion of another scratch built Ultra Stick. This mopped up the spare fuselage I built recently when constructing the twin engine version. A fin, rudder, elevators and tail-plane were built and covered on Sunday. The fit out which included the rather more torqey motor borrowed from my Fokker Tri-plane. The wing is borrowed and shared with Ultra Stick No 3. The end product is rather tail heavy so a lead pack was made up and is bolted to the front firewall behind the engine. The model is essentially a copy of my current hack No 1 air frame but sadly about a pound heavier due to the extra weight of metal geared servos, a heavier tail plane and the lump of lead in the nose. It remains to be seen how this model performs.

Last night saw the annual Croydon Club auction. Last year it was spectacular as regards the volume and quality of modelling gear on auction. This included kit from two deceased estates and the proceeds totaled about £650. The auction last night was rather dank by comparison with neither the volume or quality of gear to be auctioned. My spend was only £45 compared to about £300 spent last year. I came home with a bundle of useful covering material for £20, a cheap and nasty £3 foam fun fly model which I regard as an expendable item for some manic practice flying, one jewel of a Irvine .46 two stroke motor which is an "under license" unit built in Scotland by the now defunct Irvine company. Castings were made in Japan by the OS Max company but I believe fitted out by Irvine. To all intents, the motor is a copy of the two OS.46 units that I now have in the twin Ultra Stick. This used motor is in fine condition with plenty of compression and just needed an acetone scrub with a stiff paint brush to restore appearance. The motor is the dark red power coated unit in these next images.
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In addition to the Irvine.46 motor bought last night, I also acquired a very "dark" coloured SC .61 glow motor. This motor didn`t have a glow plug installed so compression was impossible to check prior to bidding. The motor appeared to be unusually blackened and as if it had been stored up a smokey chimney! The carburetor was seized and a spring clip was missing from the high speed mixture adjustment needle valve. Otherwise it looked reasonably sound. Little interest was shown around the room for this motor and it came to me for just £4....yes just £4. It was well worth a punt. Back home, I stripped the carburetor and found it gummed solid by congealed castor oil. A good clean up in acetone followed followed by a few drops of fresh 3 in 1 oil.That fixed, I replaced the missing mixture spring with one from my stock. Cleaning with a stiff paintbrush using more acetone had the motor looking somewhat better. Still not satisfied, I used a small nylon/brass wire brush rather like a tooth brush to remove further blackening. The final result is not perfect but quite acceptable. I installed a new glow plug and compression is just like a new and un-used motor. So I have a total bargain with this motor. A new, retail price is about £80. Physically the .61 is of identical size to a new .75 SC motor I have in stock. Both the new SC.75 and this auctioned, lightly used but somewhat soiled SC.61 use identical castings and were made in the same Chinese factory. Essentially they are the same engines but badged up differently. The .75 is just a bored and stroked version of the .61. Only a cast in 61 or 75 on the crank case denotes an increase in cylinder swept volume. A useful engine to have on the shelf.
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On a spending spree again on Monday for my next project, I`ve ordered a kit from DB Sport and Classic. This small British company bought the rights for the well known David Boddington series of models when he retired. Davids` work is well known in modelling circles. So DB now continue manufacturing his designs in self build form and supply plans, wood stock, aluminum landing gear, cabane struts and other parts as part of their "short kit" range. The builder has to supply control horns, wheels, engine radio gear and coverings and so on to complete the model. The basic kit for a 60" wingspan Bi-Stormer bi-plane is £110 delivered. A delay of about a week is expected before the kit arrives with me. The model may be powered by either of the two i/c motors described above or by the same electric motors used in my two Ultra Sticks. Perhaps I should build two fuselages and have one of each in the hanger.....More on this model when it arrives. It should be a nice build project.

Before the auction last night, the Chairman, Ian, presented me with confirmation of my A-test achievement. This took the form of a small strip of paper torn from examiner Trevors` test paperwork after I successfully completed the test last week.....not a particularly impressive record of the achievement but a prime document that I can send to the BMFA and obtain something rather better to hang on the wall. I was shocked at the completely unexpected response from other modellers in the room when Ian said I`d passed the test. A great cheer and applause came from the other guys present. I must have had a grin on my face like a Chesire cat. That meant more than any piece of paper. Here is an image sent to me by a member who was present when I took the test. It shows Trevor, the examiner on the left with me in the black shirt on the right. No 1 Ultra Stick shares the glory as a totally suitable model for the purpose! Certainly the right choice. Yesterday also saw the arrival of an email from the BMFA informing that my A-test achievement had been recorded on my profile. Very pleasing.
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Mike
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Fri May 31, 2019 7:38 pm

Just a little taster here of a few Youtube still shots of an example of the Bistormer model built from a DB Models pre-cut kit. Obviously this example is not mine but gives some idea of the general appearance of this model type.https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_cont ... 2NBrPNN89o

Of note is the large wing area and dihedral applied to both wings. This would lead to a very floaty type model(which it is) and also a fair degree of stability. Nothing is set in stone with modelling or indeed in aircraft design. Details can be changed to enable a machine to attain preferred characteristics. I envisage that the new project model will have shortened wings, larger elevators and rudder, less dihedral and ailerons on both top and bottom wings. This would make for a more lively model without spoiling its vintage appearance or compromising its overall flying characteristics. Here we go again...modifications before even the kit box has arrived!

Mike
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby JerryL770 » Fri May 31, 2019 9:00 pm

Bistormer looks likely to be a fun plane Mike. I had a little 30" span foamy biplane with ailerons in both wings, Leccy powered, it got flown to pieces. Just as well it only cost £30 from SMC, so cheap I bought 2. Second one awaits building sometime before I give up entirely :D

On the engine cleaning front I did some research when I got the OS 40FP with some 30 years dried residue to remove. Consensus was the stuff to use is Fairy Power Spray. Get it in and big supermarket. MARVELOUS!! :D :D Works a treat and no fumes of VOC's
JerryL
1970 E-Type S2 FHC. Dark Blue with Red interior. MX5 seats
Ariel Leader returned to the road since 1974 - now passed to someone more enthusiastic :)
Various R/C flying models

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Sat Jun 08, 2019 12:35 pm

A somewhat strange week with some frustration, expense and a degree of dis-appointment encountered.

Up at the Croydon field for some flying this week. The No 1 Ultra Stick which has been my faithful flyer has continued to give good service. No 6 air-frame has been fitted with the more torqey motor borrowed from the Fokker Tri-plane. No 6 is a scratch built fuselage and wing and was also flown. With the Tri-plane motor fitted with a 17x10 prop fitted, it certainly climbs quicker than the No 1 air-frame. Sadly, the wing has a bad warp in it and the model was a handful to say the least. Substitution of an original kit wing from No 3 air-frame should resolve most of the issues....one lives and learns!

Whilst at the field, we watched the Trump helicopter entourage depart far to the south east to Portsmouth from Biggin Hill for the D-Day ceremony. We phoned the Biggin Tower to inform them of our activity from our flying site in the absence of any restriction notification. Biggin seemed unconcerned so we flew a few flights and departed by lunch time. It was interesting to note that other than the Trump air movements and three incoming commercial jet flights, all small aircraft activity was non existent during that morning. We showed due diligence but whether that was appreciated is debatable.

Whilst flying, we tried to modify my transmitter program to give me a "dead cut" engine facility to make the model safer when electrically connected and very, very live. Move the throttle stick open a bit and obviously the electric motor begins to revolve. Fitted with a sharp propeller, it can do considerable personal physical damage if not very carefully handled. Our attempt was to induce a transmitter kill switch and make the model completely safe for personal handling. Annoyingly, my elderly Futaba 7c transmitter was primarily designed for internal combustion engine use which uses a different set of perimeters. A partial safety work around has been found which allows the throttle to be moved up to 40% of its travel before the motor begins to revolve. That is helpful but not a complete answer to the issue. Anyway, it is better than it was.

A trip to the model shop at Bromley saw both No 1 and No 6 on Robs` work top. Rob is a wonderful model equipment retailer who loves to help his customers sort out their modelling issues. He worked on my transmitter to further help resolve the "live" issues. What a nice helpful guy. Whilst on the bench, No 1 suddenly burnt out its UBEC unit. This is a voltage dropper which taps into the motor speed control unit and lowers voltage from the big 22.2v battery to 6v for powering the radio receiver and control servos. "Pooof", it just gave up with a nasty smell of burnt out electrical circuitry. Most annoying but I`m glad it gave up on the bench than in the air. Rob said he found UBEC units unreliable in service. Indeed, I`ve had one fail when taken new out of its packet. So we won`t be using those UBEC units any more. The work around on that is that I`ve now also installed a separate NiMh 2600mAh five cell, rechargeable battery to power the radio gear. This completely splits the power circuitry with the large 1.25 and 1.5Lb 3700 and 4500 Lipo now being used solely to power the propulsion motor with the 2600NiMh battery powering solely the radio receiver and servos. Safety in redundancy. I`m considering similarly modifying the No 6 air-frame in the light of the failure of the UBEC in No 1. With an electric Ultra Stick costing me getting on for £650, getting shot of the unreliable £17 UBEC system and replacing with the £13 2600NiMh battery seems a sensible option.

Rob also supplied me with a further Lipo propulsion battery as I was struggling with just the two 3700 and 4500 6 cell units. Having just two suitable batteries available is rather limiting unless one re-charges them on site using an adapter to link to the 12v battery on the car or some other external 12v battery supply. This third Lipo model battery is composed of two smaller separate 3 cell units linked together. I`d experienced some strange previous Lipo voltage issues recently and have had to individually cycle and adjust cell voltages to acceptable levels. At one time, we thought I had major issues with both the 3700 and 4500 batteries which I now appear to have resolved. These batteries are not cheap at £75 and £100 respectively. If one cell gives up the game in either of the batteries, then you are faced with buying complete new battery packs. That game can get mightily and unacceptably expensive. Fitting 2 x 3 cell units in series reduces the financial hit if just one cell gives up.That said, powering large electric power units is not a cheap past time. The two new Lipo units cost £80 which hurt my pocket badly. I have other things that that £80 could have funded.....Electric models have their use especially on "quiet days"at our site where on Bank Holidays, the restriction comes into force. I must admit in not being an "electric" model lover. It costs at least £250 to fund a motor, speed controller and battery for the Ultra Stick, £350 if you buy two batteries. I don`t find the battery cells easy to look after and its all a lot of faff.

The economics of using a model are highly variable when it comes to electric verses internal combustion engine. So kitting an electric Ultra Stick in motor and batteries costs £350. Compare that with my latest model build which will utilize the SC.60 two stroke motor bought all good at auction for £4 and with its fuel tank costing another £1. The motor is in sound condition and the fuel tank came in as new condition as part of a job lot bought on eBay recently. Ok, you have to fund the glow fuel at £20 per five litre tub, but that gives probably twenty flights or more use. Yes, you have the noise factor to consider but flown at the right time and place, is quite acceptable. For me, its time to get my Irvine .72 powered Ultra Stick into the sky. It could be a lot less hassle. No more battery changing and management, just a bit of sticky two stroke goo to remove at the end of a flying session. Re-fuelling is done in a minute as compared to an hours on site Lipo recharging not to mention having to open up the model and remove a battery and replace it if you want another couple of flights. I don`t find electric flying admin much fun.

The Bi-stormer "short kit" arrived from DB Sport and Scale this week. The short kit is just that. It includes a plane, dural landing gear, (less wheels), dural cabane struts, a full wing rib set, some fuselage parts, bulkheads and formers but very little else. At £110 delivered, it is rather disappointing as regards value for money. To address the short falls of a very short kit, I once again popped over to Robs` emporium. Another £60 was spent addressing the timber shortfall.
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So once again the costs are set to escalate with the finished model projection of £250. So be it. If we could`nt have taken a joke, we shouldn`t have joined!
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Now built up is the rudder, fin, elevators and tail-plane. Only a few kit parts feature in what you see below. The rudder and elevators have been slightly enlarged having perused a couple of internet forum sites and found that some modellers found the standard model to be somewhat short of tail end response. So I`ve tackled that issue at build stage. Still to be built are the remains of the model, ie fuselage and wings. As said, my £4 auction sourced .60 engine will power this model. If that proves inadequate, then I also have a .75 engine which is identical in dimensions to its small capacity brother. That would be a straight forward swap over that could be done on the flying field if required. For the remainder of the build, I envisage about another 120 hours of work will be needed. Scratch or even kit build models can take a fair amount of time but that is I suppose what gives me most satisfaction. Flying is hard work for me. The sciatic issues I have do take the edge off the pleasure which is a bit of a shame.

More on this Bi-stormer model shortly.

Mike
X350 Co-ordinator

2004 XJR

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JerryL770
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby JerryL770 » Mon Jun 10, 2019 1:00 pm

Interesting, your comments re the virtues of electric v glow power systems. I'm also a little surprised at the costs of your LiPo batteries, but I've not used 6 cell sizes. I presume you buy form HK as opposed to your LMS (local model shop)??

The problem with these multi cell LiPo's for me is that they make 'em impossible to dismantle to allow a single cell replacement. Maybe buying single cells and assembling a battery oneself could eliminate this problem.

Going to a separate battery for the controls is of course a good idea - if you have room for it. I have had electric powered gliders using a 3 cell LiPo for motor and controls with a U/S-BEC to drop the voltage for the controls without problem - so far!!. In these, there is no room for 2 batteries though larger fuselage gliders do use them. I would guess your difficulty may arise from the higher voltage supply and drop needed.
JerryL
1970 E-Type S2 FHC. Dark Blue with Red interior. MX5 seats
Ariel Leader returned to the road since 1974 - now passed to someone more enthusiastic :)
Various R/C flying models

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Mon Jun 10, 2019 11:20 pm

The biggest issue with the six cell units, Jerry, is that of individual cell management. Even using the balance charge facility, I still struggle with cell balancing within the complete pack. Like you, I and indeed many others, the problem is pretty dramatic if you get a six cell Lipo start to play up. If a cell goes, it is a major disaster. Attempting to remove a cell, (which may be in the middle of the pack) is heart rending. Firstly you think, well that is another £100 electrical component down the swanny. If you do get the pack open without blowing yourself to Kingdom Come, then the issue is re-soldering connections. Lead solder doesn`t seem to work. At that point I begin to loose the will to live......HK are certainly the cheapest suppliers but Lipo replacement even from them is not a cheap thing to have to do. In the end you get frustrated and look at the heap of serviceable £4-£50 glow motors on the bench. If I pick a good one and some of them are brand new, then one can be nailed onto a model and off we go flying again without charging issues....the only thing to spoil an afternoons flying is running out of two stroke glow motor juice! Yes, their is a place for the electric models on "quiet days" at the field, but the whole electric scene seems fraught with problems. You know where you stand with a two stroke glow motor!! My auction sourced £4 SC.61 is due to go on the Bi-stormer.....

The Bi-stormer progresses well despite the so called kit contents being rather rudimentary. It has been useful to have bulkheads pre-cut. That saves a fair amount of time. The sheet thick section fuselage sides where helpful but not essential. Otherwise, only a few pre-cut parts hae found their way into the model so far. Slashing up extra bought in sheet balsa and sticking it all together in a different order has produced the results seen in the images below. What has been constructed to date is light and seemingly very robust. The fuselage is straight, true and square. The model has a nice feel to it and I`m pleased with the results so far. The rudder and elevators are slightly larger than standard to improve control response which other modellers recommended on some of the modelling forum sites.The majority of the construction has been done using Screwfix superglue but highly stressed joints have been done with Screwfix 4 minute epoxy. Both products are excellent value and do what it says on the label.
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That`s it for tonight.

Mike
X350 Co-ordinator

2004 XJR

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Zennan101
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby Zennan101 » Tue Jun 11, 2019 8:55 am

Hi Mike,
Reading your comments about model battery packs made me think that there will be interesting threads on problems with car battery packs on the website in the near future!
Or perhaps car battery packs will be a DIY no go area with (costly) swap outs being the only option.

Rod
2010 XF 3.0 Luxury Diesel

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J44EAG
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Tue Jun 11, 2019 11:45 am

Hi Rod,

Electricity is one very dangerous form of energy. People think because something is low voltage it doesn`t have a lethal punch! Most of us will know the size of spark generated if a spanner gets put across the terminals of a vehicle battery. That is dangerous enough. Lipo batteries are at another level and need extra special care and handling. My big 22.2v six cell batteries don`t half pack a wallop too!

As we know, electrical energy discharge is instant and not for those who lack first principle knowledge as just a starting point on the learning curve. Inept and incompetent individuals should not be allowed anywhere near battery packs. Lipo units are lethal if mishandled and have the distinct habit of exploding and catching fire if badly administered. In short, I handle a Lipo as if it is a grenade with its safety pin half out!

As regards electric vehicle maintenance, lets hope its complexity keeps the DIY people away otherwise we are likely to see our A&E hospital units full of casualties. Combustion or acid burns as we know are not funny and can wreck peoples lives.

Mike
X350 Co-ordinator

2004 XJR

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JerryL770
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby JerryL770 » Tue Jun 11, 2019 3:22 pm

You know where you stand with a two stroke glow motor!!
Mike
Thumbs up emoji!! :D
JerryL
1970 E-Type S2 FHC. Dark Blue with Red interior. MX5 seats
Ariel Leader returned to the road since 1974 - now passed to someone more enthusiastic :)
Various R/C flying models

User avatar
J44EAG
Posts: 5604
Joined: Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:57 pm
Location: Warlingham Surrey/Faversham Kent

Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Wed Jun 12, 2019 11:21 pm

Yes, Jerry, I`m glad this model is going to be i/c powered. £4 for the motor and a pound for the tank.....that`s good old bangernomics for you! That gets the costs down to affordable proportions.
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The beaten up Hurricane pilot is ready to fly again having had a hard life in the Hurricane. Now having gained shoulders and a coat of paint, the fella sees the skies coming again. Also taken from the scrap bin is his dead Hurricane windscreen which fits this Bi-stormer to perfection. That too has received a coat of paint which disguises its former unfortunate and short lived life. Perhaps both will survive longer in my hands than he did in the charge of someone else....
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The fuselage has now had its cabane struts permanently fitted and the top deck added. From certain angles, it is very reminiscent of a Stampe SV4. This model is easy and fun to build. It is all straight forward enough and sanding some of the balsa block work gives a very pleasing result. Off with the hard edges in place of nice rounded and tapered sections.
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The servos are in place but space is tight. They have been moved as far forward as possible to ensure a good Centre of Gravity without having to add additional nose ballast. The electrical power switch for the radio gear can be seen in the depths of the model. With the model the right way up. the switch is easily used just by putting a finger on the switch toggle which is easily accessible on the dash panel in front of the pilot.
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These shots show the progress over the last couple of days. The project is moving well with no nasty surprises. A couple more weeks work should have the wings built and all the details nailed up. I`m greatly looking forward to flying this fifty year old design. It will certainly make a good engine test bed as well as hopefully being a dolly to steer quietly around the sky.
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Mike
X350 Co-ordinator

2004 XJR


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