I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

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davidr
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby davidr » Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:08 pm

Well done Mike! Another tree decoration coming along nicely! :D
Can I assume that the need for a custom exhaust has reduced my seasonal 2 pints of lager and a packet of crisps to a recycled Christmas card?

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J44EAG
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:47 am

Things just got worse. The Flying Club have just sent out next years membership demand for settlement before Christmas. I`m afraid any hopes for Davids` Christmas card, even a re-cycled one, will have to wait until the New Year. Anyone else expecting a Christmas card will also be dis-appointed. Like Brexit and James Bond, it will come eventually but we don`t know when.

Back to the hanger. Ailerons have been cut out from the wings and the leading edge balsa removed and to be sanded back to the top and bottom spars. The small amount of removed sheet balsa and the remains of the ribs will be replaced by 1/4" X 1.25" lengths of balsa which will be V-bevelled to create a hinge point. An identical detail also gets constructed on the trailing edge of each wing panel. Extra balsa blocks will be added to both aileron and wing components into which hinge material is placed once those parts are covered with the usual plastic shrink film.

The two wing panels have been joined during which a foot long by 10mm thick, high quality, void free birch ply joiner was inserted between a box section between the main load bearing main spars.
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A sloppy,epoxy/cotton fibre mix was applied to the joiner and the root ribs of each panel, the two wing halves were pushed tightly together with the excess glue being scraped off as it squirted out of the butt joint. The two wing halves were then pulled tightly together with cable ties until the epoxy had cured. Further glue spew was sanded away to leave a smooth joint. A layer of glass fibre tape was then laminated with epoxy over the joint and again sanded once cured. The result is neat and tidy with the glass tape laid without air bubbles onto the top and bottom surfaces of the wing sheeting.
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The wing would break before that joint could ever fail. Epoxy, additives, various glass and Kevlar products provide a bullet-proof jointing and laminating system. The same methodology is used as in full sized aircraft and marine craft component bonding and building technologies.

Four accurately placed bolt holes were drilled through the wing in the centre section. Nylon sheer bolts will eventually pass through those holes and secure the wing to the fuselage. Large blocks of hardwood have been previously built into the wing and prevent the wing ribs and external balsa sheeting from being crushed as the bolts are tightened. An under-wing fairing has been constructed on the underside of that wing centre section.
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Bulkheads at the leading and trailing edges together with spruce 1/4" square section stringers match the fuselage profiles. The structure is not sheeted with balsa. The usual iron on plastic film covering simply covers that open structure and provides final shape and form to this tertiary item without adding extra weight.

This semi constructed model was purchased as an uncompleted project. I suppose about 70% of the hard work had been done. This has left me with a very easy build which has so far been head-ache free. If I got a good push on, I suppose I could have it finished in about ten days. I have no reason to rush though, so will just quietly work my way towards completion in a relaxed fashion.The speed of final progression is somewhat dictated by what and when the engine guys can supply a solution for silencing the rather raucous two stroke motor which is the biggest "unknown" factor of the whole project.

The choice of colour scheme is an interesting subject. A Google image session provided a large number of photographs of full sized aircraft. The variety of colour schemes is mind boggling. So many different aircraft and so many colour layouts to choose from. Some simple, others extremely complex. I found a picture of one machine painted British Racing Green with a gold Jaguar leaper logo. Sadly I didn`t book mark that image. The colour was not ideal from a flyers perspective due to the dark green not being particularly conducive to good visibility. Neither is it an interesting or very inspiring paint job. It would be almost as difficult to see when airborne as my short lived Hurricane was in poor light conditions. Here are a few images of full sized aircraft in all their colourful glory. I have to find one that peeks my interest and that is not overly difficult to copy or emulate.

From a modellers perspective, parallel stripes are easy to produce but curves are more tricky. It gets more difficult the more colours there are in the scheme with multiple film over-lays often occurring. One has to ensure that weight does not occur to excess with too much material accumulating, especially towards the tail end of the model. Other common adornments such as stars or checker board patterns are tricky to apply and difficult to cut from the plastic film covering with total accuracy. Lettering or numbering requirements often result in a trip to a local plastic sign maker in order to obtain the correct sizing or to copy various logos applied to the full size aircraft. Such work is not always particularly cheap. Some of the more complicated colours schemes have been put out to vehicle wrapping specialists with covering costs coming up to the £500 mark. One is not so much paying for sticky backed vinyl, but more importantly for a man and his machine that are required to produce professional looking stickers and graphics.
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More progress updates in due course.

Mike
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davidr
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby davidr » Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:28 am

So I've gone from a case of Bollinger to not even getting a recycled Christmas card! :(
On the subject of the colour scheme can I point out that it is traditional for tree decorations to have a bit of tinsel at this time of year? :D

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Zennan101
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby Zennan101 » Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:12 pm

Mike,

Pace yourself. Leave something to do over Xmas or you might be forced to relax!

Rod
2010 XF 3.0 Luxury Diesel

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J44EAG
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Wed Dec 12, 2018 6:35 am

I am a fast builder. If I went any slower, I`d be going backwards.....super-glue speeds up a build by a huge percentage. I`d be waiting for ever for glue to set if I was using alaphatic PVA adhesive. Components would have to be pinned or clamped together during setting times. That really does slow things down. We could only have dreamed about super-glue forty years ago. Anyway, I thought this model will look great on the top of a Christmas tree or in fact any tree. David likes the idea of models in trees!

More details of this Extra 300 build. Quite a lot here in this post as it has been a while since I last added material. That`s because I`ve been busy building.

The build continues. For the first time, ever having laid dormant for many years, this part built model now has wing bolt captivation built into the fuselage which enables the wings to be securely and accurately fitted. Captive nuts and nylon sheer bolts provide the dismantle-able jointing between wings and fuselage. A captive nut has tangs on the back of which together with a blob of adhesive ensure that they are securely mounted once located correctly. These particular fittings are on the large size with the sheer bolts being 8mm diameter with the captive nuts also being somewhat over-sized. The plans show normal 6mm bolts but a problem arose when I came to buy them. The commonly available Du-bro products come as 6x50mm and 6x76mm diameter and lengths. Whilst I had a packet of the 6x50mm bolts in stock, the 6x76mm bolts are not common and are currently rarer than ducks teeth. Suppliers told me there is no sign of them becoming available at least until February. A trawl though industrial suppliers web sites also turned up a blank result. At one point I even looked at using replacement toilet seat bolts from Screwfix or Toolstation. Again the were not long enough for my requirements.

Two hours were spent on the internet and on the phone trying to source any available 6x76mm nylon sheer bolts. I always buy packs of at least ten bolts at a time, both as flying field spares and for use on my future builds. 50mm bolts accommodate the majority of model needs but this 80" model requires the rather longer 6x76mm bolts which are less easily available and less popular. Even if I could have sourced a couple, whilst I would initially be out of trouble, where would I stand with my spares stock? None existent and not what is required for the future. Fortunately, one of the internet suppliers I use suggested the 8mmx80mm bolts and that provided a quick alternative that got the project going again within seconds. It is interesting to note these nylon 8mm bolts have a drilling down the centre of the threaded portion right up to the bolt head. Drilling the bolt in this way provides sheer ability should the model impact with a fixed object. Whilst damage will inevitably be sustained, sheer bolts do at least reduce the amount of damage occuring. When the Super Chipmunk ended up in a tree, the sheer bolts broke and only minor damage was done to the fuselage. It could have been a lot worse if I had used metal bolts.

The captive nuts and their alignment with the wing is critical and time consuming. Each nut fits into a pre-drilled hole and is "dragged" into the hole using a threaded stud, plain nuts, washers and suitable spacers.
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When that takes place, one has to be careful that the nuts enter the hole squarely and that any angled fixing plates within the model have been installed parallel to the outside surface of the wing.
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This ensures that the underside of the bolt head sits flatly upon the under-surface skinning of the wing. Tapered packers may be needed to get that angle correct. Installation can be time consuming and occasionally frustrating. The aim is to have all mounting bolts set so that the bolts pass through mounting holes in the wings without binding. The bolts should screw in and out without resistance or interference.
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Three of the four bolts set up quite easily. The fourth took three times the length of time to install than the other three together! There is always one that is going to be awkward.

The fin has now been fixed to the fuselage using cotton fibre thickened epoxy. Preparation required sanding of the 1/16" sheet balsa, profiling of the leading and trailing edges and slots cutting in for hinges. Similar methodology is applied to the rudder, elevator, wings, tail-plane and ailerons. That work is slightly tedious in as much as it is repetitive, rather boring and there is a lot of it. As an example, the large Ultra Stick model needed twenty five hinge points to be created and twenty five hinges to be inserted and glued in place. I try to break the tedium down by just working on each part until boredom strikes. Then I do something more interesting before returning to finish the remaining parts. I suppose this type of work is my least favourite but it has to be done or a model won`t ever get flying.

The landing gear has been constructed from pre-formed Duralumin supplied as part of the kit. This is restive to moderate landing impact deformation when the model takes off or lands. Once again, captive nuts together with stainless bolts are used to secure the complete under-carriage to the model. The Dural has been lightened by cutting two holes within a non-stressed portion of the unit.
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The holes align with two other holes within the plywood under-structure of the model. These may be suitable as an exit for the engine exhausts.

A small steerable tail wheel has been constructed. This locates in the lower fin stock with a 90 degree tang or in this case a small bolt which is screwed into a collett on the tail wheel piano wire unit. A small piece of fuel tube is pushed ov
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er the bolt, has a hole drilled in it and a small screw inserted. The screw locates in a dowel set into the rudder. The tube acts as a shock absorber for the servo and prevents stripped drive output gears.It is simple cheap and should be effective with helping ground based taxying.

Four standard size metal geared servo units have been trial fitted to the aft end of the fuselage.
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This breaks normal model convention in as much as the servo weight being so far aft of the Centre of Gravity position partially off-sets the heavy weight of the motor and silencers mounted at the front of the model. Four 800mm long radio control power and signal feed cables run down the fuselage within a light weight carbon fibre tube conduit.
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This encapsulates the cables providing support along the entire length of the cable. The conduit also guards against cable metal fatigue and a consequential increase in cable current resistance due to cyclic load stress reversals caused by engine vibration. The carbon fibre conduit is from the dead ex-Hurricane wing spar which has been salvaged and re-circulated into further use.
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The weight of the conduit and cables is probably about the same as a typical Bowden cable or push-rod installation. The advantage of the "fly by wire" installation increases control resolution by keeping the final servo to control surface push-rod length down to an absolute bare minimum.

Two servos act together in "push AND pull" configuration to give a very powerful input to the rudder. Being mounted on opposite sides of the fuselage and with lever arms being mounted on each side of the rudder allows for easy installation and immediate and correct servo action.

The elevator control is more complicated. Again two servos are used and both will eventually operate via short push-rods to the two separate elevators, each with its own control horn and short push rod piano wire linkage. Both elevator servos must have the appropriate duplicate "push OR pull" action. Typically, a pack of servos are supplied as "normal" units which may be set by the manufacturer to rotate in either a clockwise or anti-clockwise output at the servo arm. My servos are of normal clock-wise rotation. It is possible to buy "reverse" action servos which run with an anti-clockwise output.

However, reversing the action of a particular servo is DIY possible by un-soldering electrical connections and swapping over the cables within the servo at the drive motor and feed-back potentiometer connections. One has to have a steady hand and a small soldering iron to do this modification. Once reassembled and installed in the model, seen from below the fuselage, the two servos, one on each side, both acquire the same "rotation" direction and therefore the same output action. The modified servo has a label with an "R" written on it which signifies to me that I have reversed its action. When commissioning of the transmitter and receiver begins, one can often find the individual control action outputs in the wrong direction. Button pushing on the transmitter can again change that input/output response, ie, a pull back on the transmitter elevator stick should be met by the appropriate "up elevator" reaction at the control surface.

The tail plane has received modifications as suggested in the kit addendum sheet. I can`t work out why the previous owner/builder missed this out. Perhaps he built this tail unit first before he discovered the mods sheet. The leading edge spar is from balsa. Advice gleaned from the internet suggested that this tail-plane was prone to flex under load. Hence the mods sheet remedial action requirement. Rather than trash the leading edge of the tail-plane, I elected to cut off 1/4" of each leading edge and simply epoxy full depth spruce hard wood strips onto the remaining balsa.
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The combination of epoxy and hardwood stiffens things up a bit.That done, the tail-plane was sanded smooth and the leading edges rounded off.A V-bevel was applied to the trailing edge, with another applied to the leading edges of the elevator. Eight pin hinges will be inserted between the tail-lane and each elevator. This allows the elevator to move in similar fashion to a door on a hinge. Sanding the tail-plane which was grub stained and still had glue snot raised above the sheeting joints was rewarding. This down at heal looking component took on a new lease of life.

Once the tail-plane was sorted, I slid it in through its mounting slot on the fuselage. With a bit of trimming and sanding, it fitted perfectly which lead to it being glued into place with an epoxy/cotton fibre mix. as the exitement grew, I couldn`t resist trial fitting the elevators and rudder in place.
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Dimensionally, and physically, I no longer had an incomplete build, but something that resembled a significant and very large model aircraft.

Spurred on by the progress made in little more than a week, I rang Just Engines whom I had approached to build a custom exhaust for this model. It was all positive stuff with a cost estimate of around £160 being mentioned. Davids` case of Bolly for next years Christmas present already now looks to be in jeopardy. I have a little more work needed to detail further the amount of space available into which the JE exhaust can be fitted.
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I`ll have to produce a full sized drawing which will further define the front fuselage structure to the millimeter, together with the exact location and hard dimension points of the DLE 40 motor and its exhaust flange detail. The space inside the cowling is also important. Once all those hard points have been established, the drawing can be sent to JE with a view to the exhaust fabrication beginning in the first week of January. Fortunately, JE have several DLE 40 motors on the shelf and one of them can be used as a template for identical motor dimensions. In the meantime, I`ve plenty to get on with.

Another job completed is a basic cockpit colouring with the usual iron on plastic film together with adding instruments to the dash panel. I found sheet of stickers I had bought sometime back and a quick Google image reference gave me enough detail to emulate the layout found in a full size aircraft. It may not be totally accurate but that matters little. It adds some interest to the model and is one step up the ladder from having no instrumentation at all. A one fifth size light weight plastic pilot should complete this area.
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More details in due course.

Mike
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Zennan101
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby Zennan101 » Wed Dec 12, 2018 12:18 pm

Mike,

A suggestion for you sourcing bolts. When I was into classic motorcycles there were always numerous stands at any bike jumble selling stainless bolts (which were always in demand) and standard bolts of course. Could be worthwhile to try the small ads in publications such as Old Bike Mart for small engineering firms that don’t do the internet and who are used to producing ‘one offs’ and small quantities for bike enthusiasts.

Rod
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby RichardSEL » Wed Dec 12, 2018 12:25 pm

I use regularly "Modern Screws" in Old Bexley Village. They specialise in old screws. (snigger)
I've never beaten them yet, and that goes back to my radar days when a Marconi Radiolocator IV (originally designed just after WWII) was still in use.
Last edited by RichardSEL on Wed Dec 12, 2018 6:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Gone: '59 Mark I, '56 Mark VIIM, '59 Mark IX, '01 XJ8 Sovereign 4L LWB, '01 XJ8 Sport 3.2L, '01 XJ8 Exec 3.2L
Current: '03 Strange Rover L322
In trim shop for total refurb: '73 Owen Sedanca 4.2L
Stalled in storage '61 Mark IX with 4.2L

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Wed Dec 12, 2018 12:47 pm

Thanks for the leads, guys.

The 75mm Du-bro bolts will come back on the scene in February so I`ve learned from the sales rep in this country. Oddly, Du-bro let their warehouse stock dwindle to nothing. I`m apparently not the first person having a cuss about the non-existent stock level at this present time. Somebody hasn`t kept their finger on the pulse in the USA. It is little different from Jaguar Classic Parts letting heater matrix components for a X350 run out earlier this year! Fortunately, the 8mm bolts I managed to source by the lunchtime will do the job and were considerably cheaper than the Du-bro offerings. So I`m out of trouble now with this issue for the time being but will be re-stocking with the 6mm jobbies whenever they make a re-appearance on the market.

Mike
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davidr
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby davidr » Thu Dec 13, 2018 12:01 am

I realised when chatting with Mike the other night that I've actually flown in an Extra 300 with the Blades Aerobatic Team out of Sywel Aerodrome just north of Northampton.
These guys are amazing - the passenger flight of your life! The pilots are former Red Arrows and the experience of flying with them in close formation aerobatics was one of my lifetime highs. Best not to have a big lunch beforehand!

https://www.theblades.com/about-the-aircraft/

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Mon Dec 17, 2018 10:23 pm

Yes, you do need a strong stomach for aerobatics. I managed to disgrace myself when air testing a Stampe over Stroud after an over-large breakfast during my LAME training course. I wasn`t well received back at the hangar.

The Extra build progresses. Its been picky work mostly at the front end. Initially I got the cowl to fit the fuselage. The ABS moulding is not a good one and had been joined by the previous owner. It left a bit to be desired, but tidied up reasonably well. I cut two engine cooling air ducts towards the back edges with an air dam arrangement designed to force air past the cooling fins on the cylinders.
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That went well enough.

Then issues arose. The two spark plugs and HT lead caps fouled the inside of the cowl. Shorter plugs are available but that meant the HT leads also needed replacing. The cost came to nearly £120 which was prohibitive. On the basis of that high cost, I took the poor mans option and drilled two 76mm diameter holes in the cowl.
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Not pretty and not very scale like. On the basis that practicality must always over-rule aesthetics, this brutal modification allowed the standard ignition set- up to remain and also gives full and free access to the spark plugs and their leads. The large holes also allow more engine heat to dissipate so I suppose that can only be a good thing. Its a shame but there we are. The eagle eyed will also perhaps spot that the front air inlets on the cowl have also been opened up.
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With the fuel tank and throttle servo now in place, I installed the solid state ignition module within the fuselage together with a 400cc capacity smoke oil tank. In this image the tank is to the right with the ignition module to the left. The little square ply box in the centre is a mock up smoke system fuel delivery pump.
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The real item will come from Just Engines in the same postal delivery as the custom built exhaust system. The boys at JE are nearly ready to begin building the exhaust but it is unlikely to arrive until the new year.

The colour scheme has been decided upon. Dark blue and white as main lead colours with grey or silver as stripe and definition detail. Red may also find its way into the scene. A couple of rolls of covering will be arriving shortly. So the model continues to make progress although I`ve slowed down a bit recently. The sciatica is playing me up causing me to have to rest more often than I would like.

Frustratingly, walking is now causing me severe pain issues which are very debilitating. People have said I should have a Blue Badge for parking. I`ve fought this off for a number of years now but this afternoon I got down to filling in the Government form. Typically it is written by someone who has little idea of what disability means. The form is chaotic and lacks a cohesive flow. So many questions have loaded leads which in some case is useful but in most cases serves to aggravate because a question may have been given a similar airing earlier on the form. So I`ve pinged off the completed form and up-loaded JPG images of my driving license, passport and my version of a low pixel passport photograph. And I`ve paid a tenner. It will be interesting to see how this pans out as the form questions really don`t relate to something as fickle as sciatica. So that is it. Now I do feel my sixty year age and impending decrepitude!

I was to have recited a limerick on the perils of advancing age. Its rather rude so I`d end up moderating myself or David would enjoy doing the warning for poor conduct.

Mike

Mike
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Fri Dec 21, 2018 10:54 am

The Extra is now coming on in leaps and bounds. Although still waiting for Just Engines to agree the exhaust design, covering of the model has begun. This is on the basis of a simple blue, white and grey punctuated layout. The predominate colour is a very nice blue accentuated by the blue. Grey pin stripes blend the white and blue together. The covering material is from the UK warehouse of the American Hobby King empire. Although the price has risen slightly over the last few days and a fivers post is always applied to any order, this covering is remarkably cheap being sourced from China.

At around £9 for a five metre x 600mm length, it is hugely more cost effective that the equivalent German made Oracover product which retails at £18-23 per two metre x 600mm length. It is the same material used on the recently built Fokker Triplane. It is very easy to apply, resists puckers and creases on corners and has a very high gloss finish. It adheres well to a dust free structure and will peel off again if mistake has occurred. So here is the start of the covering session with the fuselage and tail feathers being tackled to date. The result brings the rather sad looking part built model I acquired a couple of weeks ago to a very pleasing standard.
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One set back occurred and the air turned blue. The smooth sanded wing slipped through my fingers and landed on the floor. Part of one leading edge and a small amount of leading edge sheeting sustained damage. I was not a happy bunny. The repair entailed cleaning up the edges of the damaged sheeting, reinforcing and then gluing the whole pile of bits back together with epoxy. Leveled up with epoxy filler and sanded to profile, one can hardly see the repair. It will disappear completely once covering has been applied.
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Various parts continue to arrive through the post. It is hard to keep track of what is still outstanding. This model is fairly complex as regards the spark ignition module and its fail safe technology. One small electronic box still to be received is a spark kill switch which will activate if transmitter or receiver signal is lost. A sensible unit to build into the model. With over a pint of two stroke petrol mix in its tank, this model could fly quite a distance before fuel runs out. The CAA would not look kindly on me if I failed to build in this redundancy module.

Drones......What can one say. The latest occurrence at Gatwick is not likely to gain the drone flyers any sympathy for their section of the aero-modelling hobby. In defense of the sensible drone flyers who operate from accredited Clubs and fly in accordance with CAA mandates, I have sympathy as there will no doubt be repercussions. Needless to say the people responsible for the Gatwick incident won`t be responsible Club members, have insurance or will they care two hoots for their own actions. This subject is unlikely to disappear for quite a while.

I have a difficult day ahead. An inconvenient appointment at St Thomas Hospital on Westminster Bridge at 14.45, having got there by train to Waterloo. I face a half mile walk to the hospital and the same back to the station having seen a consultant. Then I have to get the train back again from Waterloo, Clapham and Croydon to home on the Friday evening before Christmas...... I`m not looking forward to that as there will be standing room only on the train. The back and sciatic right foot will be screaming by the time I get back. The good news on the disabled front though is that I`ve been awarded a Blue Parking Badge without any contest. Notification arrived within 36hrs of pinging off an online application. Full marks at Surrey County Council for a brilliant service. It seemed appropriate I should phone them with my sincere thanks. Somethings do go right !

Mike
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby RichardSEL » Sat Dec 22, 2018 12:26 pm

The good news on the disabled front though is that I`ve been awarded a Blue Parking Badge without any contest. Notification arrived within 36hrs of pinging off an online application. Full marks at Surrey County Council for a brilliant service. It seemed appropriate I should phone them with my sincere thanks. Somethings do go right ! Mike
Well done on the Blue Badge front. Just a quick note to say that here in loony Labour Lewisham they apply special "nurses" to test you to see whether you're as unable to walk as your medical history suggests. Their decision overrides what ever doctors or specialist consultants recommend. Anybody would think their just trying to force residents to cough up the £120 a year for a residents' permit. Nah! That's far too cynical... :oops:

The Gatwick drone operators are being triangulated for their control signals' location. Two have been caught AFAIK today. They're deliberate, not just irresponsible kids. But don't be surprised if draconian legislation suddenly appears against the, in the main part, responsible hobbyists. During the CB campaign, the then Radio Regulatory Dept of the Home Office tried to put it about that "drug deliveries" and "prostitution" were being organised by CB
:) Then there was the one about IRA bombs being detonated remotely by CB ... :P
Gone: '59 Mark I, '56 Mark VIIM, '59 Mark IX, '01 XJ8 Sovereign 4L LWB, '01 XJ8 Sport 3.2L, '01 XJ8 Exec 3.2L
Current: '03 Strange Rover L322
In trim shop for total refurb: '73 Owen Sedanca 4.2L
Stalled in storage '61 Mark IX with 4.2L

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Sat Dec 22, 2018 7:51 pm

Nothing really suprizes us the older we get.

I too have had run ins with officialdom that has operated in a way that suggests they think they have the ultimate say or power. They can pretend as much as they like but in my experience it is what the Law specifically states that eventually decides whether someone either receives an award or has it dis-allowed. Unfortunately so many organisations and or their private contractor companies, attempt their own version of the Law and then try to bamboozle the populous into believing their contrived rendition. In other words, they bend the Law rather than bend to it.

The judiciary are well aware that this type of antic is common with so called all powerful authorities. The secret when fighting corruption, fraud, deformation of character/condition or misinterpretation of the Law, is to know what that Law itself actually states and how it is to be administered. In a court, a Judge will often consider whether fairness of action has been applied and whether knowingly the contesting advisor has contrived a "mis-truth designed to deceive and mislead this Honorable Court". (A phrase I enjoyed using in my divorce affidavit some years ago!). So a man staggers into Court on his knees and is clearly unable to walk, substantive evidence justified by several witness and professional opinions, and the lowest qualified adverse opinion gets totally discounted. One day I would love to take an "adverse opinionator" to Court for damages. Sadly that costs money which I can`t afford to spend giving one of these oichs a legal bash on the `earhole! We seem to have gone badly off thread.......Back to the models.

It is hard to predict what the knock on effects for genuine and law abiding drone flyers will be following the Gatwick incident. It is early days but the CAA are fair minded and model flying has the BMFA to negotiate on their behalf. A section of the model flying brigade cannot be punished or penalised for the actions of a rogue who has got his hands on a drone for subversive activities.

Back to this model thread then. The Extra is progressing well. The rudder and elevators have now been hinged and fixed to the fin and tail-plane. Hinging is one of my least favourite jobs. Slots have to be cut and opened out in each component ensuring that the pivot points in a run of hinges all line up along a straight line.
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On this hinge session, twelve hinges were installed and epoxy fixed in place. One has to ensure that any excess epoxy squirting out from between the hinge and its insertion point is removed whilst still uncured with acetone and a rag. That done, I then scrub each hinge with more acetone and a toothbrush to ensure the epoxy is dissolved where it might have got between each pivoting section of a hinge. It is rather tedious work and one might have to flood the hinge and scrub several times if one notices any stiffening of a hinge movement. One the adhesive is fully hardened, one car breath a sigh of relief. Ideally a hinged control surface should fall under its own weight without any binding being noted.

With the surfaces hinged, small plastic control horns are carefully positioned and through bolted with 2mm diameter bolts, washers and nuts. Thread lock is used to ensure nuts do not loosen in service. With the horns in place, one can make up the control push rods from short lengths of piano wire cut to the required length. One adds threaded control clevis`s each of which has a 2mm ID thread. The lengths of piano wire then each have a 2mm thread cut with a die onto each end of the wire. Lock nuts secure the final location of the clevis components on the wire and precise adjustment is made by screwing the clevises in or out at each end of control rod.
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So one clevis attaches to the flying surface at the control horn whilst the other clevis connects direct to the output arm on a control servo.
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This close coupled arrangement on this Extra couldn`t be a tighter install. Four servos, two "push and pull" on the rudder and two more servos for the elevator each of which mirrors its partner servos actions exactly in either a "push or pull" direction.
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Mounting the four servos for elevator and rudder controls in the tail of the model helps to counter the mass of engine weight at the front end of the model. as always, the Centre of Gravity balance point of the model is critical.

It would appear that tomorrows activities will include making a start on the covering of the wing. Parts continue to arrive in the post but alas not the exhaust system build which would appear to be on hold with Just Engines until the New Year.

Mike
X350 Co-ordinator

2004 XJR

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RichardSEL
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby RichardSEL » Sun Dec 23, 2018 10:01 am

As a radio freak (and qualified seagoing ships' radio officer) myself, the worst was the Marine Wireless Offences Act that "outlawed" pirate radio ships on the spurious grounds of them wiping out ships' distress frequencies.
All generated by the then loony Labour government who ensured their allies' (the State Broadcasting Corporation aka BBC) monopoly wasn't disturbed. Thus ensuring a continued flow of socialist propaganda pumped out by it. Another unholy cabal with the RRD solomnly giving technical assurance to that lie. Even Radio Peking was embarrassed :P

Eventually Margaret got the message when RRD tried to stop Channel 5 (the UK's 5th terrestrial analoge channel) from transmitting saying that there were no more channels available! Under political manifesto pressure they "allocated" the VCRs' channel which meant a national army of re-tuners were employed to re-tune VCRs, early DVD players, and early satellite receivers away from Channel 5's broadcast channel.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Autograph-Bo ... 3564354420

After that debacle in the mid-90s then Minister Edward Leigh and others headed up a task force to oversee the abolition of the RRD -- effectively dispersing their staff and their state power monopolist thinking to other government departments. Course, surreptitiously they're trying to get back together again through joint working parties and the like.

Yes, back to models :cry: Your radio control channels were re-allocated from 27MHz back in the late 70s early 80s. But they should'nt have been left on 27MHz all those years anyway... They were left there by the RRD in the knowledge that illegal CB operators would cause their legalisation campaign public relations harm by all these models "falling out of the sky due to illegal CB signals" as reported by: yes you've guessed it -- the British Broadcasting Castration :mrgreen:
Gone: '59 Mark I, '56 Mark VIIM, '59 Mark IX, '01 XJ8 Sovereign 4L LWB, '01 XJ8 Sport 3.2L, '01 XJ8 Exec 3.2L
Current: '03 Strange Rover L322
In trim shop for total refurb: '73 Owen Sedanca 4.2L
Stalled in storage '61 Mark IX with 4.2L

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J44EAG
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Location: Warlingham Surrey/Faversham Kent

Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Sun Dec 23, 2018 12:09 pm

After I gave up model flying around 1978, frequencies again changed. Indeed I have an old but seemingly still serviceable 35Mhz set up here which came as part of the job lot of odds and sods I bought in Essex recently. I assume that it is still ok to operate on that frequency band.

All the latest gear is digital on 2.4Ghz. Apparently this makes the gear far less susceptible to interference. The receiver is paired to a particular transmitter which then locks to two components together and makes it almost impossible for any other transmitter to "get in the back door". My particular system is known as FASST. Details on the internet. I suppose a similar system my have been used by the people active during the Gatwick scare. One assumes that the authorities and advisors looked at ways to bring down that drone by targeted interference. On the basis of that drone being FASST or similar system based, I would have thought they might have had an almost impossible scenario on their hands.

Mike
X350 Co-ordinator

2004 XJR


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