I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby [email protected] » Thu Apr 11, 2019 5:10 pm

Things have settled a bit as regards my Father. Parkinsons is a dreadful disease with awful effects often similar to a stroke. Mental degradation, physical immobility, behavioral issues, and general normal action impairment. Symptoms vary from minute to minute and any form of careing varies from reasonable to downright impossible. <snip>
Dunno whether you caught:
https://www.radiotimes.com/tv-programme ... episode-2/ transmitted last night. There is some progress being made -- but from what you describe perhaps ineffective by now? :cry:

Had a test for it at my GP who asked me to remember an address and then perform some other tests when randomly she'd ask me for the address again. Well, as my last job was as a Met call receipt 999 operator/dispatcher, a previous practiced skill is hardly ever lost even with early signs of mental degredation. I'd demanded the senility testing coz my right hand shake has increased over the years (sporadic) -- particularly when just about to put the soup spoon to my lips :lol:
As a former telegraphist the shake is something that will occasionally occur. But weirdly goes away when I'm back in front of a morse key. I try to go to the Titanic tribute radio station every year at Fort Perch Rock, New Brighton
https://www.radioofficers.com/galleries ... ch-museum/

Bests in empathy...

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Thu Apr 11, 2019 7:29 pm

Thank you, Richard.

The situation has again stabilized. Its not the first time my Mother and I have seen the excruciatingly disturbing effects of Parkinsons within my Father. I find that issuing plenty of water to help re-hydrate the brain and a spoon full of honey has an almost immediate positive effect when combined with some sleep. I`ve lost count of the times when we have been tempted to call for medical assistance in the middle of the night when all that has been needed is to carry out this simple action. Half an hour later, the situation changes and relative calm returns.

In the case of Monday`s incident, this happened to be a particularly vicious Parkinsons attack with an unusually insidious onset. Adjusting basic medication in discussion with the medicos will hopefully help. At the end of the day, the condition is degenerative and far reaching. Quick cures are never going to be possible with the disease at such an advanced stage. We have had to learn to observe situations on a minute by minute basis and to have to be prepared to experiment slightly when it comes to correcting chemical imbalance. The only slightly amusing thing to come from all of this was that the hospital consultant told me that he thought I knew more about Parkinsons than he did! Apparently he found my descriptions of the effects highly informative. There is me an aircraft engineer and I`m not even a Junior Doctor!!

Back to the modelling again. On Tuesday I belted over to Rob at Avicraft in Bromley for more supplies. The intention is now to build a twin engine Ultra Stick so materials were needed. Another £94 spent and a few more trees now being turned into wings and fuselages. This time, I`ve decided to build two fuselages and decide later if just one will be used with two nacelles being constructed for the engines on the wing or alternatively just have the two fuselages and matching engines share a stretched but common wing. Plenty of time to decide. To date, all the wing ribs were previously cut out when I produced a set for the clone wing. So two sets of everything now needed for the twin engine version are now being cut from ply and balsa sheet.The kitting takes a bit of time bt results are quick to come once all the parts are to hand.

This afternoon saw me down at the Riddlesdown MFC site just South of Edenbridge. The access track has now been restored following the onslaught of the incessant tipper lorries which wrecked the track over the winter. We are now assured the tipping is finished so hopefully the track can be kept in passable condition. So that issue is now fixed but to our dismay we found that the farmer had sub-let ground immediately around the landing strip and the flying pits area with the result that this afternoon we struggled for even basic parking space. Words are due to be said with our Landlord. The situation is difficult but not impossible given that just a hand full of members are on site during week days. Come the week end, the situation would definitely be less than satisfactory.

I took both the electric Ultra Stick and an i/c powered 0.72/12cc version with me. To my delight I hooked up with another founder member of our original club that I hadn`t seen for forty four years! Joy of joy!! It was wonderful to recall how Graham would pick me up from school in a battered Ford Pop fitted with a pre-cross flow 1500cc engine and three speed manual box. I`d chuck off my blazer and tie and we would shoot off to the local model shop in Caterham or Croydon for bits for our models. Then we would spend the evening flying before stopping off at the pub on the way home. Graham recalls my Mother giving him a very black look as he took me home completely legless on one occasion. Homework went out of the window and often reflected in poor end of term report figures. I`d have much preferred an engineering education from the age of about seven rather than some of the useless tosh which I found myself subjected.

Graham took charge of the first flying stages this afternoon with the electric Ultra Stick, passing me the transmitter once the model was flying. I had eight great minutes flying this model in Grahams company. It was indeed Graham who taught me to fly all those years ago when I was about thirteen years old. Every time Graham spoke, the years just tumbled backwards. Same voice, same tones, same instructions.There can`t be many returning flyers who find themselves flying with the same man who taught them more than forty years earlier. I was immediately happy flying the Ultra Stick but my landing was a bit short of the landing strip resulting in a rather ragged arrival in the recently ploughed land around the strip. The Ultra Stick bounced and survived without damage.

A few minutes later, I felt confident enough to hack the model down the strip and pull it into the air. A few basic aerobatics were tried followed by half a dozen good circuits. With a little flap applied, I made a good landing without any problem. A quick battery change followed and I was back in the air again. Feeling ever more confident, I managed to tighten my flying up to the stage where I felt well in control and able to place the model around the field were ever I wanted it to be. My circuit flying lined the model up with the strip nicely and I even managed a "touch and go". This is were you land the model then immediately apply power to pull it back into the air whilst still rolling down the strip. My final landing was spot on a marker in the centre of the strip. Dave, the Chairman said I had performed a very passable flight and that the Club instructor was going to have an easy task getting me through the two proficiency tests. Tonight I`m well pleased and feel now feel confident enough to fly from the much smaller Croydon MFC site over towards Biggin Hill. If the weather is good tomorrow, I might take a shot at that. The big oak tree in the middle of the site looms menacingly...it has already had the Super Chipmunk!

Sorry, no images tonight but will hopefully be able to post some flying shots shortly.

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Thu Apr 18, 2019 11:02 am

Last Saturday saw this thread hit twenty thousand times. Six days later, it has acquired almost another five hundred hits. The hit rate appears to be about eighty a day! In two months following the first anniversary of this thread, some five thousand extra hits have occurred. Thanks again to all who have been watching and reading about a subject that is totally unrelated to Jaguar matters!!

It has been a busy week. At long last we have broken into Spring and the model flying has started.

So four successful flights were achieved with the electric Ultra Stick last week and I`m pleased with the model and indeed my own flying capabilities. Tomorrow sees me back down below Edenbridge for a training session. Hopefully I shall be able to get some action shots and be able to post them here.

I`ve started work on the twin engined Ultra Stick. Two fuselages have been built. One will go to the twin engine model with the two OS Max .46/7.5cc motors being housed in two engine mounting nacelles mounted either side of the fuselage on a stretched wing. The second fuselage has been built as a spare. It was easy to build two units once core components had been made for the first unit. It was just a matter of copying those parts to provide components for a second fuselage. Manufacture of the two fuselages has taken just six days.
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A second used .46 has been sourced from Florida and should be with me shortly. The motor came at a reasonable price but shipping, import VAT and Royal Mail account for almost another 50% of the cost of the transaction. Why buy from America? In this case, the supply of good UK sourced motors of this type is becoming difficult. Most are reaching the end of their reliable lives. I bought one good and hardly used OS .46 last year but have struggled to find a similar second motor from within the UK. In America, these units are plentiful and there are many that are still as new and unused or lightly used but are still in great condition. Hence me having to go to the USA to source what I need.
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So it now looks like I shall have six Ultra Sticks in the hanger. The eventual aim is to see all of them flying together in formation. That obviously requires six good flyers and six different transmitters. Rob at Avicraft tells me that he managed to get seventeen of his Panic bi-plane designs all flying together. Quite some achievement of organisation.

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Mon Apr 22, 2019 10:33 pm

Friday saw more flying activity and pretty intense it was too. Down to Edenbridge again for some instruction. The regime is pedantic and mentally exhausting. The instructor pushed me hard adjusting my circuit flying technique on the electric Ultra Stick. That aspect doesn`t appear to be causing me any issues. I had to learn to tighten up my flying technique and demonstrate horizontal figure of eights at a constant height. That took real concentration. I have to get approval to fly off the trainer "buddy box" system which links a tutor/master transmitter to a pupil/slave transmitter. I found that irksome and frustrating. However it is one of the rules down there and I have no option but to endure this rather frustrating situation. I was on my last legs when I got home and have had to rest up. The last two weeks spent transporting my disabled father to hospital together with the hard physical legwork needed when flying has left me quite flat and tired. I need to learn how to pace myself and not let the searing sciatic pain in my right leg and foot control me. I need to take things rather easier.

Several short flights took place with the US using the smaller 3700mAh Lipo and a 14"x8" pitch propeller. This was the set up used when the model first flew back in November. We noted the model appeared to fly tail down as if the centre of gravity was a little too far aft. Having flown the model with the bigger 4500mAh battery fitted, the extra one third of a pound nose weight appeared to cure the tail heaviness. removable lead ballast will now be added when the model is fitted with the lighter battery. The instructor felt the model required more urge that it could provide with the 14"x8" propeller fitted. I had a 15"x8" prop in the flight box and fitted that. Certainly more urge generated and the model became less inclined to dive downwards when traveling down wind. The 15" prop would appear to have more "grip" than its smaller brother, so this prop will become its standard equipment.

Once I can clear my exhaustion, some air time is needed flying out of the Croydon Club site near Biggin Hill. I`m allowed to practice there alone and without being linked to the tiresome master/slave transmitter system. Although training is necessary, I have enough time under my belt with the US to allow me to practice quietly and safely without the additional mental effort of having to listen to an instructor. I`ll be happy to go back onto the Edenbridge training regime once I have more air time on this model. The Croydon site allows me the practice facility so it is now time to get up there and get used to that smaller flying area again. Only by getting myself into that groove will the next confidence building stage begin to occur. If the model gets wrecked in the process, well I have several more to hand! The biggest off put at the Croydon site is the massive model eating oak tree which lurks waiting to catch out flyers when they get their landing approaches wrong!

Two more fuselages have now been completed. No 5 is a slightly modified unit with the tail plane being able to be fitted to the fuselage using removable 6mm nylon sheer bolts. This fuselage is destined to become part of the next twin engine version of the Ultra Stick which has a stretched wing to accommodate two wing mounted engines. As a consequence of the wing stretch, the tail-plane will also receive a proportional increase in size. The removable tail-plane allows some size
experimentation to be undertaken without having to hack into a glue joint if modification is needed. The fuselage can also be converted back to standard single engine configuration if so wished.
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The No 6 fuselage has been built as a standard specification spare.

The stretched wing is approximately 184mm longer than a standard wing.
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Essentially 92mm have been added to each wing half to allow for lost wing area due to the area behind each of the engine nacelles robbing the wing of area and aerodynamic lift. The wing stretch puts that lost area back into the equation. In this shot, the standard wing and the stretched wing are shown together.

Three ribs out from the centre wing rib show the approximate position of the two engines.
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The right hand engine is an OS max .46cu inch/7.5cc unit that will be fitted to the model. The left hand engine is a rather smaller OS .35 that is shown just as a demonstrator in this image. Another imported OS .46 awaits delivery from the USA and has spent the Easter weekend languishing in a Customs and Excise shed up at Heathrow prior to delivery here hopefully over the next few days.

Tonight the continued wing building has stalled. A lack of 2mm light ply material stops further work. This will be addressed tomorrow with another trip to the Bromley model shop needed to top up supplies. With this twin engine model, I`m breaking from known ground. The model is something of an expensive experiment with an unknown end result ahead. One thing is certain. The model will either fly like a witch or be a total nightmare! One of my next jobs is to find an experienced twin engined flyer to test fly the model and to help with any required further development. Then there is the noise aspect to consider. Are two engines going to put this model above the normally accepted 82dB noise limit? Exiting times ahead. As I`ve often said, "When you are at the cutting edge of research and development, one often expects a complete disaster"!! If you want to find out what happens with this model, keep watching this thread.......

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Thu Apr 25, 2019 12:45 am

I`m staggered to see that within ten days of my comments made last Saturday week noting that this thread had seen twenty thousand viewings in about fourteen months (fifteen thousand three hundred viewings in the first year), this thread in the space of another ten days, has accumulated another thousand hits. Over one hundred viewings everyday! If this interest rate carries on at the same rate for another year, then we can extrapolate a hit rate of about thirty six thousand hits on this thread alone annually! James and I have agreed that is pretty phenomenal by any internet yard stick and is perhaps down to a strong story line, images and high technical value. The fact that the thread contains little or nothing as regards a Jaguar car content, makes its popularity rather intriguing. I`d certainly welcome your own views as to why you might think this thread is receiving so much attention.

Now rested up a bit after the heavy physical onslaught last week, I`ve spent time continuing to build the twin engine Ultra Stick wing. A further supply of building materials was gleaned from Rob Newman at Avicraft in Bromley, Kent. This model making mecca is an icon of two generations of Newman family serving the needs of the model making fraternity. Like "Arkwrights Store" in "Open all hours", this emporium is fully loaded with modelling goodies. If Rob doesn`t have what you need when you visit, he can certainly get it within a few days. Not only that, Rob helps you select what you need and you get his full and wide experience to help you achieve your aim. Old school service at its best and from an ex-grocers shop that looks like something from the 1930`s!

Whilst at the shop, Rob spent a full half hour showing myself and other interested customers how to set up my two radio transmitters as master and slave units. This included ensuring that when the master transmitter pass over switch was activated, control passed to the slave unit whilst ensuring that all control surfaces on the model stayed at the same position as the master unit and a seamless transfer of control from master to slave occurred. The electronic set up of a model is perhaps the hardest part to learn and absorb when one is fairly fresh directly into the hobby or as a returner as indeed is the case with myself.

Back at Base Camp had me cutting a 2,5mm ply front wing spar from the newly sourced materials and building that onto the new wing structure. That has gone well and a balsa leading edge has been added. After that, some profile sanding was carried out an the leading edge checked to ensure it was straight and true. The wing was checked over to ensure similar accuracy was present across the whole structure. The wing is now straight and free of any constructional warpage and is ready to receive the engine nacelles and internal structure. Extra wing ribs have been made and will find themselves added to the wing as further building takes place. These ribs sit in approximately the correct position atop the wing in these next images.
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The design for the engine nacelles has been penned on paper and a template will be cut tomorrow with four identical parts being cut from 2mm sheet lite ply.
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The parts will receive laminated 3mm balsa sides before being inserted into the wing. Some of the freshly cut ribs will be added to the sides of the nacelles to act as reinforcement and as glue landing strips onto which 2.5mm balsa wing sheeting will be fixed. With that sheeting in place on the wing, the structure will stiffen significantly and will be sufficient to take torque loads from the twin engines.

The Florida sourced and now very rare OS Max .46 engine is due to arrive tomorrow. An expensive acquisition at £82 which includes the £42 engine, USA carriage, UK Customs import duty and Royal Mail delivery. That stings a bit as the matching brother engine I acquired as part of a job lot in November came to me for literally pennies! That`s how it goes in this game. If you want something, you have to sometimes dig rather deeply. That cost is balanced by another eBay job lot of fuel tanks. A typical new fuel tank will retail at about £7. My eBay win of about nine new and used tanks came to me at £12 including post. One wins and looses in various degrees.
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One thing is sure. I won`t have to buy any more fuel tanks for a while.

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Thu Apr 25, 2019 3:15 pm

Lovely Jublies!

I now have the two matched motors for the twin engine Ultra Stick to hand. The one bought from a guy in Florida is a real cracker and matches the one I had to perfection. The new unit is hardly used and in fact probably has a tad more compression than my original unit.
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Perfic!

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Tue Apr 30, 2019 11:25 pm

Five days on from my last posting, a fair amount of hard work and long hours have been put into the twin Ultra Stick.

This construction has not been straightforward. It has been like building a wing and two fuselages as one mass. Modified fuselage sections were used as the basis for the two engine nacelles.
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The four sides of the two nacelles were cut from 2mm ply and included wing rib profile sections. With the un-sheeted wing in the raw, the nacelle sides were carefully aligned and glued into the wing.
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Bulkheads were later added. Wing sheeting then commenced.Here, the wing is trial fitted to fuselage No3.
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With bulkheads added to the nacelles, engines have now been trial fitted. Internal fuel tank floors, tanks and two small servos remain to be fitted. The servos will operate the carburetors/speed control and their power/control cables have been fitted into the wing. Four more power/control cables have also been laid for the two aileron servos and the two flap servos. Not surprisingly, the wing is fairly weighty having two engines which weigh a pound each and the six metal geared servos adding another three quarters of a pound. By comparison, on this model, apart from two servos for the elevator and rudder, a small NiMh power battery and a micro receiver, the fuselage will be the light weight object, all the weight has transferred to the wing. It looks likely that with over two pounds of weight set well forward of the centre of gravity position, that the rudder and elevators servos may well end up mounted in the tail of the model. I also envisage the power battery also going well towards the tail.

The set up is unusual to say the least. It looks even dafter when I set the wing upon the fuselage of No 3 which has a large 1.08cu in engine installed conventionally in the fuselage. A Tri-motor Ultra Stick? Well there is an idea....
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The No 5 fuselage is destined to be allocated to this twin configured model. The tail sections have yet to be constructed.
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The Civil Aviation Authority have dropped an unexpected bomb on the model flying fraternity. Whilst at consultative stage, the proposals included registering all flyers, charging them for the privilege, and spending a massive £2.5m setting up a data base. Our controlling body, the British Model Flying Association already hold such a data base of insured members and this has been offered to the CAA. No reply to that communication or offer has been received from the CAA and it would appear quite obvious that the proposal is money making rather than anything else. We have just three weeks to reply to the proposals with the outcome of whatever transpires likely to become law by November this year. That Law will also require that ANY flown models weighing more than 250gms also require to be registered and with their own registration letters applied to those models. I suspect that might include a childs kite!!!! Talk about gross "Over Gold Plating" by a Government quango.

One has to ask? Who would see registration letters at 150ft of altitude? This video analysis gives a fair idea of the pointlessness of the draft proposal as it currently stands. If the powers that be think that registration of flyers or models will control the antics of rogues of the type that caused the Gatwick scare before Christmas, then in my opinion they are mis-guided and ill informed. Rogues don`t join modelling clubs. That sort will set out to cause maximum mayhem whilst keeping their heads under "the radar". Essentially, genuine and law abiding modellers are being punished for the activities of anarchists.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lha_puQpOus

The above is the biggest single attack at bona-fide modelling activities ever witnessed in the UK. A draconian regime seeks to wreck the activities of over 170,000 law abiding UK modellers whilst giving an over egged and an over priced data base contract to its chummy private contractors. So much for a democratic society that says it attempts to keep free the right to undertake law abiding leisure activities.

Not a happy Mike.
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Wed May 01, 2019 4:50 pm

Followingmy post last night regarding proposed changes to the way in which modellers will be required to operate, the text for a call to action sent out by our controlling British Model Flying Association is shown below.

"Further to the recent publication of CAP1775 which launched a consultation on the CAA's proposed arrangements for registration fees for operators of unmanned aircraft, the UK model flying association (BMFA/LMA/SAA & FPVUK) held a meeting last night with advisers.

The text in CAP1775 is far more serious than the issue of registration fees alone. The consultation reveals that key policy decisions (such as age limits, not allowing us to register members on their behalf and repetitive competency requirements) appear to have been imposed on us in the absence of either consultation or the further discussions the DfT/CAA publicly promised.

The policies outlined are inconsistent with the EASA Regulations for model flying associations, because they mandate requirements which should instead be subject to negotiation and agreement with us prior to incorporation into our operational authorisation. As the scope of the consultation is limited to the fee arrangements, it does not invite comment on these wider policy issues.

As the CAA/DfT have evaded engagement with us on policy development since the end of 2018 and have now seemingly closed the door on us with CAP1775 , we believe that it is now time for members to hold them directly to account.

The attached document (UK Model Flyers - Call to action) summarises the views of the UK Associations, explains what we hoped to achieve and outlines where we believe the CAA/DfT have failed our members, who are the largest single stakeholder group affected by CAP1775. Hard copies of this document will also be sent to every member with the next issue of the BMFA NEWS.

This call to action is just one element of a wider co-ordinated campaign. There is still a long way to go with this and please be assured it is by no means the end of the story.

Please read the attached document and respond as outlined and please respond to the CAA consultation if you have not done so already https://consultations.caa.co.uk/finance ... istration/.

We need a big response on this and we would urge every club and every member to help us".

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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby JerryL770 » Sat May 04, 2019 8:33 pm

I would re-iterate entirely what Mike is saying above as this is an almost unprecedented attack on British model flying activities. Not only that but if implemented will be highly detrimental to the livelihoods of those folks who endeavour to make a living providing us with the materials for our hobby.

The video Mike referenced is eye opening in the explanation of what is proposed by the CAA and illustrates the ridiculous cost estimates for undertaking this proposed registration scheme.

The BMFA has produced a detailed summary of the position and call for action which is here:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/q09zwr819trdh ... 3.pdf?dl=0

I for one, will be putting pen to paper.
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby JerryL770 » Sun May 05, 2019 11:10 am

Slow progress on the Flair Cub build but the rebuilt fuselage is now ready for covering.
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I discovered, to late, the real reason the original tail was so out of line. This was because the front section of the fuselage was not built straight by the original owner. The formers were not perpendicular to the sides resulting in one side being slightly forward of the other. I considered, after having built on the new back end in taking it all apart again but this was just a step too far. However, this still resulted in a bent fuselage which I only really saw when it was built up and glued together :oops: The stringer running along the top of the fus was a curve :? Adding a couple of permanent cross braces pretty much cured this but it's not a silk purse :lol: It will be OK though.

Wing construction next.
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Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Mon May 06, 2019 12:22 am

At least it is coming back together now, Jerry. It isn`t always easy to see the issues until another piece of structure gets added. Then the cussing starts. Pulling structure apart after it has been glued is a nightmare of a job.I have a similar slight issue with the starboard engine nacelle on the Twin Stick. Hopefully it shouldn`t be difficult to correct although a couple of saw cuts may be needed to release the fault. Then I`ll try again!

Despite the downer associated with the latest CAA bombshell, I`m continuing the building and hoping for better news from the battle front in due course. It is certainly rather demoralizing to have a constructive hobby demonised by a statutory authority. The worst thing is the total lack of transparency combined with evasive intransigence demonstrated by the authorities prior to informing that, without any consultation, a new law is to come into being come November 2019. The fact that the CAA/DfT chose not to engage with the sports predominant association makes this new law and its implications seem like something out of "1984". One hopes for better days ahead.

The Ultra Stick wing nears completion with the tail sections constructed today. For the first time, the complete fuselage, wing and tail sections have been fitted together. The twin US has its wing span increased by some 180mm with a proportional increase in length also added to the tail plane sections. The ailerons are proportionately longer than standard but the flap dimensions have been left at normal length. The extra 180mm in wingspan appreciably adds to the dimensions of the model and here in the hangar, ground floor area available to me appears to have diminished! Everywhere I look, there is an Ultra Stick. I go into the workshop and there is another. It is the same story in the garage and inside the Peugeot Pope Mobile.....Ultra Sticks as far as I can see!!
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All my Ultra Sticks are the typical orange, white and black colour scheme. At times it has been a hunt to grab one particular model for examination or further work. The wings of some of the models live in two of the original kit boxes and provide some protection against "hangar rash". However that doesn`t help me find a particular wing that easily. Once the boxes are opened, I then have to go through the wing pile to find the one I want and all of them apart from the low wing version are almost identical! The number on each fuselage can also be found on the wings. That does help somewhat.

So. A bit more work needed on the wing to complete the engine nacelles. Then the wing will need covering and have the control servos, tanks and engines fitted. A couple of servos will need to be fitted in the fuselage, and a nose cone section needs designing and building to fit where the engine would have been located in the single engine variant. The Centre of Gravity will need adjusting and control horns and piano wire linkages constructed. At that point, this model will be near complete.

Mike
X350 Co-ordinator

2004 XJR

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J44EAG
Posts: 5657
Joined: Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:57 pm
Location: Warlingham Surrey/Faversham Kent

Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Tue May 14, 2019 8:57 am

The twin Ultra Stick progresses.

The wing is now covered and servos and control horns fitted. I just have to make up the control linkages with adjustable clevis ends and the wing is done. Engines will then be installed and tank covers fitted. All the weight is to the front of the wing which makes it somewhat awkward to handle. As said previously, the fuselage is light in weight as all the mass has transferred to the wing. Fuselage servos look as if they will be tail mounted to off-set that weight shift.Certainly, the model is something of an odd ball. Weight will be about 9.8Lb so it will be the heaviest of the Ultra Stick group. The extended wing length will hopefully come into its own. One thing is fairly sure. This model will land fairly rapidly and will be rather more techy to operate.
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More flying with the electric Ultra Stick has been carried out at the Croydon site near to Biggin Hill. The full size two seater Spitfire based there has been out and about doing air experience flights for paying customers. £4750 for a 55 minute flight down to Dover and back. That is £86 per minute! The circuit is well to the east of our flying field with only the occasional overflying by full sized aircraft. If you see one coming, you just fly your model low or get down on the landing strip and keep out of the way. It isn`t an issue at all or is the imposed 300ft height ceiling. There is plenty of room for all air space users.

Today the weather is sunny but rather gusty. I might make another visit to the flying site and get some further practice in.

Mike
X350 Co-ordinator

2004 XJR

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JerryL770
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Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2017 6:36 pm

Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby JerryL770 » Tue May 14, 2019 6:18 pm

Does the twin US have flaps, Mike?

With that length of wing, I would have thought they were possible. As a racing glider flier, all my planes have bottom hinged flaps (which can go down 60°+) and when deployed, both ailerons go up a little. Down elevator is mixed in to compensate for the increase in lift caused by the flaps going down. All 4 surfaces react to aileron control input. Into wind, the glider can be stationary like this. However, depending on wind strength, it is best to keep moving forward as if there is a sudden drop in wind speed ........ there's a sudden drop of aircraft :oops:

I doubt you would want more than about 30-45° of flap down to get a useful drop in landing speed. Probably a suck-it-and-see job. Test the flaps at height with the elevator compensation adjustable in amount so's you can assess any ballooning or dive due to the ele travel.

Of course you need a decently programmable Tx to do this. I use the FrSky Taranis+

Hope I'm not teaching Grandma/pa(?) :lol:
JerryL
1970 E-Type S2 FHC. Dark Blue with Red interior. MX5 seats
Ariel Leader returned to the road since 1974 - now passed to someone more enthusiastic :)
Various R/C flying models

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J44EAG
Posts: 5657
Joined: Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:57 pm
Location: Warlingham Surrey/Faversham Kent

Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Wed May 15, 2019 7:22 am

Hi Jerry.

Apart from being a twin with a wing stretch, the wing is pretty much standard but with standard length flaps and stretched ailerons. All surfaces are centre hinged permitting movement up or down. Crow is possible given a more sophisticated TX/Rx system. My Futaba 7c system is rather basic though. As per the standard US, I`ve mixed in a little down elevator when flaps are deployed. Seemingly, I don`t need much down flap to make quite a difference to speed control. Presently deployment is on a rotary pot switch which is quite useful. Just a quick tweak when required gives quite an increase in lift and also ability to climb off the strip at a very steep angle. In strong winds yesterday, in order to keep penetration when landing, I left flaps up and just powered the model in using power as required.
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The latest CAA developments still concern me. The general view is that it isn`t the club guys that need controlling but the rogues who fly drones from the boot of the car off the side of the road. They will probably lack competency, be un-insured, have no knowledge of the Air Navigation Order and operate in a fashion likely to cause complaint or incident. They will be restive to being registered and operate outside of good practice. I predict that if another incident were to occur, they would be the ones likely to upset the CAA and then we might see a blanket ban across the whole hobby. I see this so called consultation (only discusses pricing of registration not modus operandi) to be a complete waste of time. Clubs have been self regulating for years but this is being ignored by the CAA to the extent of completely dis-engaging with our controlling association(s). The CAA are shooting at the wrong section of the hobby and will miss the proper target by miles. Will they listen? I think not.

Mike
X350 Co-ordinator

2004 XJR

User avatar
J44EAG
Posts: 5657
Joined: Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:57 pm
Location: Warlingham Surrey/Faversham Kent

Re: I usually drive an XJR but now I`m going to be a Hurricane pilot!

Postby J44EAG » Fri May 17, 2019 1:14 pm

I`ve been active this week at the Croydon/Fickleshole site practicing for my A-test. This has been done on an almost daily basis in weather conditions that have been somewhat boisterous. It is no use just being a fair weather flyer. My tutor says my flying skills are up to requirement and my mission is to now absorb and retain answers to 23 questions set by the British Model Flying association and also those contained in the Croydon MFC rule book. The examiner will chose five questions to which one is obviously required to provide correct answers. I now await a date and time for the test.

Given the practice I have put in at the somewhat restricted Fickleshole site, the flying area appears to have "expanded". It is now no longer daunting to operate in quite close proximity to the large trees which surround the flying area. One soon learns the flying lines needed to take off or land a model. Set atop a hill, there can be quite violent up and down droughts generated from the land shape and mass and also trees and hedges. These can either blow the model skywards or suck the model towards the ground. One has to learn to predict what might happen and be instantly prepared to input corrective action. Mentally, a ten minute flight can leave you feeling quite drained due to the intense concentration needed to avoid piling the model into the ground or into a tall tree!

It is interesting from a personal perspective to note ones rate of adaption and also improvement in skill level as the amount of flying time gradually accumulates. Earlier this week I found I was avoiding flying in gusty weather. I had to blast through a degree of funk and fly whether I felt comfortable or not. Then a penny would drop, a skill level improve and what had been a problem would begin to be markedly less worrying. Practice and improvement certainly makes you mentally less strained and the flying standard visibly begins to rise. Model flying involves a very steep learning curve which is unforgiving if you get something wrong. A plastic dustbin bag full of plywood, balsa and covering material is the expected result. The skill is in making sure that doesn`t occur!

I operate will high pain levels on a daily basis. A collapsed lower lumbar and acute sciatica in my right foot act as a sort circuit on my reserves of strength and ability to stand around. This impacts heavily on my personal life in many ways as well as affecting me when model flying. During my last flight yesterday, I sat on the edge of a robust table top placed behind the guard netting which gives model flyers protection in the event of someone having an "eventful" model landing. I`d noted tyat I had been pacing up and down the pilots area whilst flying. Sitting on the edge of the table stopped the pacing and forced me to fly in a "box" immediately in front of me. As a result, my flying discipline improved again. One of the test requirements is to cut model power completely and rapidly descend with a view to achieving a decent landing without adding power to correct any problems. That part of the test is perhaps the hardest part. It is not unusual to end up in the "rough" if one doesn`t quite get the manouevre right. Yesterday, whilst sitting on the table edge, I got the Ultra Stick down on the landing strip on three consecutive occasions without having to save the model from an excursion into the surrounding rough field by applying power. I was quite pleased with that! A week ago, I doubt whether I could have done that. That I was sat on the table rather than pacing around obviously improves my technique as well as reducing my general pain levels.

Back home again, the twin Ultra Stick has now been completed and just awaits transmitter/receiver set up together with an engine running in session. Croydon club members pointed me towards perhaps the best flyer locally. James Gordon is Chairman of the Caterham MFC as well as being well known to us at Croydon Airport MFC. A quick phone call has secured James` services as test pilot once I have engines running well and any technical issues sorted. This includes sound level testing which will possibly be a barrier to this model flying if I can`t achieve sensible noise levels.This hobby is all about jumping hurdles! Anyway, here are images of the completed model with its presently rather elongated knock off main fuselage nose cone. Length can be adjusted as required. As it stands, this model is a real odd ball. It remains to be proved whether it will fly like a witch or be an unholy horror!! James will be the lucky person to find out!!!
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Right. Back to cramming the brain with A-Test question answers.

Mike
X350 Co-ordinator

2004 XJR


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